The things the Internet teaches you

I read a lot of author blogs, and every time an author blogs about another author who has a blog, I add that new author’s blog to my Google Reader. Thus, I have a lot of author blogs in my Google Reader, which means I don’t always read all of them. Sad pancakes. But! Sometimes I click on an author’s blog that hasn’t been updated as much recently (and so has fallen off my day-to-day reading radar) and I find something wonderful inside. That’s what happened a couple of minutes ago when I checked in with Christine Fletcher, author of Ten Cents a Dance.

dance_175To be honest, I didn’t know much about Ten Cents a Dance, but Christine’s newest post was all about some events she’d done in Chicago. I grew up there, and I lived there a couple of years ago while I was getting my master’s at the University of Chicago, so my interested was piqued. Christine’s first event was at the Norwood Park Historical Society, which pretty much floored me, because my grandmother has lived in Norwood Park my entire life–I even lived there with her for a summer–and I had no idea they even had a historical society, located in the oldest house in Chicago no less. It’s, like, ten blocks from my grandmother’s house. I wonder if my parents even know it exists; I feel like they must, they’re history buffs and my grandmother has lived in that house for twenty-five years, but they’ve never taken us there. I will make sure that changes next Christmas, mark my words.

I’m pretty excited about Ten Cents a Dance, but then, being Polish myself, I’m pretty excited about most stories about Polish people (except Polish Wedding, which I didn’t like), especially when they take place in Chicago.

Cool stuff I can’t do but you totally should

Luckily for anyone in the NYC metro area, just announced today on Scott Westerfeld’s blog, there’s going to be a NYC Teen Author Festival March 16-22, 2009. Doesn’t that sound fun?

What? No, I’m not bitter I can’t go. Even though so many of the authors appearing on the panels are people whose blogs I read religiously and whose books I really like. It’s fine. I have a job, and I’m grateful for that. I’m not at all upset that I’m missing Scott, Justine Larbalestier, David Levithan, Diana Peterfreund and others discuss their juvenalia*, even though I admire their bravery because you’d have to threaten me with extreme bodily harm before I’d agree to do that and EVEN THEN I wouldn’t be able to because I have absolutely no idea where any of my juvenalia is, or if it is even still extant. I mean, that doesn’t even sound cool at all. Lots of YA authors reading from works in progress or playing in a rock band or signing books or celebrating teen readers? SNORE.

Whatever. You should go, though. LUCKY.

*There are three different ways I can think of to spell that word (“juvenelia”, “juvenilia”, and “juvenalia”) and they all look totally wrong. I’m going to trust that Scott Westerfeld got it right. I’m not even going to look it up, that’s how much I trust him. It’s like that game where you fall backwards into someone’s arms except with words, which makes it even scarier.